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Neurotransmitters present in intestines affect the brain

Neuronal cells in the brain carry out many signal transmissions

The daily pace of life greatly affects our brain. For example, activities like walking, chewing and breathing give excitement to the brain, and that provides a moderate tension to various activities during the day. If the body cannot detect such rhythm properly, it will be unable to receive this moderate tension and diseases including depression and chronic fatigue syndrome may be caused.

There are a vast amount of neurons in the brain. The Information communication between these neurons allows the brain to send appropriate instructions to the body. A neurotransmitter is necessary in order to transfer information between these neurons.

Currently, a multitude of neurotransmitters are being discovered. The most commonly known neurotransmitters are GABA, dopamine and serotonin. GABA for instance, is an abbreviation of γ-aminobutyric acid and is synthesized by using glutamine which is one of amino acids. Dopamine is synthesized from phenylalanine. Serotonin has variety functions among neurotransmitters in the brain and is also called “happy substance (happy hormone)”.

Serotonin is converted from tryptophan, which is one of the essential amino acid that we must take from our daily diet, by the action of two enzymes: tryptophan hydroxylase and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase. Scientists have revealed that serotonin, which regulates the body rhythm, works like a hormone, and is involved in the sleep state. Furthermore, serotonin is responsible for numerous physiological functions such as the adjustment of body temperature, the recognition of pain, appetite control, digestion and absorption. 95% of the serotonin that takes such diverse roles is synthesized in intestines.

The Serotonin synthesized in the intestines is just as important as an information transmitter as the one synthesized in the brain

The daily pace of life greatly affects our brain. For example, activities like walking, chewing and breathing give excitement to the brain, and that provides a moderate tension to various activities during the day. If the body cannot detect such rhythm properly, it will be unable to receive this moderate tension and diseases including depression and chronic fatigue syndrome may be caused.

There are a vast amount of neurons in the brain. The Information communication between these neurons allows the brain to send appropriate instructions to the body. A neurotransmitter is necessary in order to transfer information between these neurons.

Currently, a multitude of neurotransmitters are being discovered. The most commonly known neurotransmitters are GABA, dopamine and serotonin. GABA for instance, is an abbreviation of γ-aminobutyric acid and is synthesized by using glutamine which is one of amino acids. Dopamine is synthesized from phenylalanine. Serotonin has variety functions among neurotransmitters in the brain and is also called “happy substance (happy hormone)”.

Serotonin is converted from tryptophan, which is one of the essential amino acid that we must take from our daily diet, by the action of two enzymes: tryptophan hydroxylase and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase. Scientists have revealed that serotonin, which regulates the body rhythm, works like a hormone, and is involved in the sleep state. Furthermore, serotonin is responsible for numerous physiological functions such as the adjustment of body temperature, the recognition of pain, appetite control, digestion and absorption. 95% of the serotonin that takes such diverse roles is synthesized in intestines.

Credit to: Muneaki Takahata Ph.,D.